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Alsaʹtia

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The Whitefriars sanctuary for debtors and law-breakers. Cunningham thinks the name is borrowed from Alsace, in France, which being a frontier of the Rhine, was everlastingly the seat of war and the refuge of the disaffected. Sir Walter Scott, in his Fortunes of Nigel, has described the life and state of this rookery. He has borrowed largely from Shadwell’s comedy, The Squire of Alsatia. (See Petand.)

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Entry taken from Dictionary of Phrase and Fable, edited by the Rev. E. Cobham Brewer, LL.D. and revised in 1895.

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Alphabet
Alpheos and Arethusa
Alpheus (in Orlando Furioso)
Alphesibea
Alphonso
Alpleich
Alpue, Alpieu (Alpu)
Alquife (al-kē-fy)
Alrinach
Alruna-wife (An)
Alsatia
Alsvidur
Altamorus (in Jerusalem Delivered)
Altan Kol
Altar (An)
Alter ego
Althæa’s Brand
Althea (Divine)
Altisidora (in the “Curious Impertinent”)
Altis
Alto relievo

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Alsa`tia