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Anacʹreon

.

A Greek poet, who wrote chiefly in praise of love and wine. (B.C. 563–478.)

Anacreon of the Twelfth Century, Walter Mapes, also called “The Jovial Toper.” (1150–1196). His best-known piece is the famous drinking-song, “Meum est proposʹitum in taberʹna mori,” translated by Leigh Hunt.

Anacreon Moore. Thomas Moore, who not only translated Anacreon into English, but also wrote original poems in the same style. (1779–1852.)

Anacreon of the Guillotine. Bertrand Barère de Vieuzac, president of the National Convention; so called from the flowery language and convivial jests used by him towards his miserable victims. (1755–1841.)

Anacreon of the Temple. Guillaume Amfrye, abbé de Chalieu; the “Tom Moore” of France. (1639–1720.)

The French Anacreon. Pontus de Tyard, one of the Pleiad poets (1521–1605). P. Laujon. (1727–1811.)

The Persian Anacreon. Mohammed Hafiz. (Fourteenth century.)

The Scotch Anacreon. Alexander Scot, who flourished about 1550.

The Sicilian Anacreon. Giovanni Meli. (1740–1815.)

Anacreon of Painters. Francesco Albaʹno, a famous painter of lovely females. (1578–1660.)

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Entry taken from Dictionary of Phrase and Fable, edited by the Rev. E. Cobham Brewer, LL.D. and revised in 1895.

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Amulet
Amundeville
Amyclæan Brothers (The)
Amyclæan Silence
Amyris plays the fool
Amys and Amylion
Anabaptists
Anabaptists
Anacharsis
Anaclethra
Anacreon
Anacreontic
Anachronism
Anagnostes (Greek)
Anagrams
Anah
Anana
Anastasia (St.)
Anathema
Anatomy
Anaxarete

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Anac`reon