- skip - Brewer’s

Anatheʹma

.

A denunciation or curse. The word is Greek, and means to place, or set up, in allusion to the mythological custom of hanging in the temple of a patron god something devoted to him. Thus Gordius hung up his yoke and beam; the shipwrecked hung up their wet clothes; workmen retired from business hung up their tools, etc. Hence anything set apart for destruction; and so, set apart from the Church as under a curse.

“Me tabula sacer

Votiva paries indicat uvida

Suspendisse potenti

Vestimenta maris deo.”


Horace: Odes (v. 13–16).

⁂ Horace, having escaped the love-snares of Pyrrha, hangs up his votive tablet, as one who has escaped the dangers of the sea.

previous entry · index · next entry

ABCDEFGHIJKLMNOPQRSTUVWXYZ

Entry taken from Dictionary of Phrase and Fable, edited by the Rev. E. Cobham Brewer, LL.D. and revised in 1895.

previous entry · index · next entry

Anacharsis
Anaclethra
Anacreon
Anacreontic
Anachronism
Anagnostes (Greek)
Anagrams
Anah
Anana
Anastasia (St.)
Anathema
Anatomy
Anaxarete
Anaxarte
Ancæos
Ancalites
Anchor
Anchor (The)
Anchor Watch (An)
Ancien Régime
Ancient