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Broom

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A broom is hung at the mast-head of ships about to be sold, to indicate that they are to be swept away. The idea is popularly taken from Admiral Tromp; but probably this allusion is more witty than true. The custom of hanging up something to attract notice seems very common. Thus an old piece of carpet from a window indicates household furniture for sale; a wisp of straw indicates oysters for sale; a bush means wine for sale; an old broom, ships to sell, etc. etc. (See Pennant.)

A new broom. One fresh in office.

New brooms sweep clean. Those newly appointed to an office find fault and want to sweep away old customs.

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Entry taken from Dictionary of Phrase and Fable, edited by the Rev. E. Cobham Brewer, LL.D. and revised in 1895.

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Brogue
Brogues
Broken Feather (A)
Broken Music
Broken on the Wheel
Broker
Brontes
Bronzomarte
Brook (Master)
Brooks of Sheffield
Broom
Brosier
Brother
Brother German
Brother Jonathan
Brother Sam
Browbeat
Brown
Brown as a Berry
Brown, Jones, and Robinson
Brown Bess