- skip - Brewer’s

Broken Music

.

A “consort” consisted of six viols, usually kept in one case. When the six were played together it was called a “whole consort,” when less than the six were played it was called “a broken consort.” Sometimes applied to open chords or arpeggios.

“Here is good broken music.”


Shakespeare: Troilus and Cressida, iii. 1.

Lord Bacon in his Sylva Sylvarum gives a different explanation: he says certain instruments agree together and produce concordant music, but others (as the virginal and lute, the Welsh and Irish harps) do not accord.

previous entry · index · next entry

ABCDEFGHIJKLMNOPQRSTUVWXYZ

Entry taken from Dictionary of Phrase and Fable, edited by the Rev. E. Cobham Brewer, LL.D. and revised in 1895.

previous entry · index · next entry

Broad Bottom Ministry (1744)
Broadcloth
Broadside
Brobdingnag
Brobdingnagian
Brocken
Brocklehurst (The Rev. Robert)
Brogue
Brogues
Broken Feather (A)
Broken Music
Broken on the Wheel
Broker
Brontes
Bronzomarte
Brook (Master)
Brooks of Sheffield
Broom
Brosier
Brother
Brother German