- skip - Brewer’s

Half

.

Half is more than the whole. (Πλεoν ημισυ παντoζ). This is what Hesiod said to his brother Perseus, when he wished him to settle a dispute without going to law. He meant “half of the estate without the expense of law will be better than the whole after the lawyers have had their pickings.” The remark, however, has a very wide signification. Thus an embarras de richesse is far less profitable than a sufficiency. A large estate to one who cannot manage it is impoverishing. A man of small income will be poorer with a large house and garden to keep up than if he lived in a smaller tenement. Increase of wealth, if expenditure is more in proportion, tendeth to poverty.

“Unhappy they to whom God has not revealed,

By a strong light which must their sense control,

That half a great estate’s more than the whole.”


Cowley: Essays in Verse and Prose. No. iv.

previous entry · index · next entry

ABCDEFGHIJKLMNOPQRSTUVWXYZ

Entry taken from Dictionary of Phrase and Fable, edited by the Rev. E. Cobham Brewer, LL.D. and revised in 1895.

previous entry · index · next entry

Hair by Hair
Hair devoted to Proserpine
Hair of a Dissembling Colour
Hair of the Dog that Bit You (A)
Hair stand on End
Hake
Hal
Halacha [rule]
Halberjects or Haubergets
Halcyon Days
Half
Half
Half-baked
Half-deck
Half-done
Half-faced Groat (You)
Half-seas Over
Halfpenny
Halgaver
Halifax
Halifax (in Nova Scotia)