- skip - Brewer’s

Diēs Iræ

.

A famous mediæval hymn on the last judgment, probably the composition of Thomas of Celaʹno, a native of Abruzzi, who died in 1255. Sir Walter Scott has introduced the former part of it into his Lay of the Last Minstrel.        

“Dies iræ, dies illa,

Solvet sæclum in favilla,

Testē David cum Sibylla.”

On that day, that wrathful day,

David and the Sibyl say,

Heaven and earth shall melt away.

1


E. C. B.

previous entry · index · next entry

ABCDEFGHIJKLMNOPQRSTUVWXYZ

Entry taken from Dictionary of Phrase and Fable, edited by the Rev. E. Cobham Brewer, LL.D. and revised in 1895.

previous entry · index · next entry

Didactic Poetry
Diddle (To)
Diddler (Jeremy)
Diderick
Dido
Die
Die
Die-hards
Diego (San)
Diēs Alliensis
Diēs Iræ
Diēs Non
Diēs Sanguinis
Dietrich
Dieu
Difference
Digest (The)
Diggings
Diggory
Digit
Dignitary (A)

See Also:

Dies Irae