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Halcyon Days

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A time of happiness and prosperity. Halcyon is the Greek for a kingfisher, compounded of hals (the sea) and kuo (to brood on). The ancient Sicilians believed that the kingfisher laid its eggs and incubated for fourteen days, before the winter solstice, on the surface of the sea, during which time the waves of the sea were always unruffled.

“Amidst our arms as quiet you shall be

As halcyon brooding on a winter’s sea.”


Dryden.


“The peaceful kingfishers are met together

About the deck, and prophesie calm weather.”


Wild: Iter Borealë.

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Entry taken from Dictionary of Phrase and Fable, edited by the Rev. E. Cobham Brewer, LL.D. and revised in 1895.

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Hair Stane
Hair by Hair
Hair devoted to Proserpine
Hair of a Dissembling Colour
Hair of the Dog that Bit You (A)
Hair stand on End
Hake
Hal
Halacha [rule]
Halberjects or Haubergets
Halcyon Days
Half
Half
Half-baked
Half-deck
Half-done
Half-faced Groat (You)
Half-seas Over
Halfpenny
Halgaver
Halifax

See Also:

Halcyon Days