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Half-seas Over

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Almost up with one. Now applied to a person almost dead drunk. The phrase seems to be a corruption of the Dutch op-zee zober, “over-sea beer,” a strong, heady beverage introduced into Holland from England (Gifford). “Up-zee Freese” is Friezeland beer. The Dutch, half seeunst’s over, more than half-sick. (C. K. Steerman.)

“I am half-seas oʹer to death.”


Dryden.


“I do not like the dulness of your eye,

It hath a heavy cast, ʹtis upsee Dutch.”


Ben Jonson: Alchemist, iv. 2.

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Entry taken from Dictionary of Phrase and Fable, edited by the Rev. E. Cobham Brewer, LL.D. and revised in 1895.

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Hal
Halacha [rule]
Halberjects or Haubergets
Halcyon Days
Half
Half
Half-baked
Half-deck
Half-done
Half-faced Groat (You)
Half-seas Over
Halfpenny
Halgaver
Halifax
Halifax (in Nova Scotia)
Halifax Law
Hall Mark
Hall Sunday
Hall of Odin
Hallam’s Greek
Hallel

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