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Ich Dien

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According to a Welsh tradition, Edward I. promised to provide Wales with a prince “who could speak no word of English,” and when his son Edward of Carnarvon was born he presented him to the assembly, saying in Welsh Eich dyn (behold the man).

The more general belief is that it was the motto under the plume of John, King of Bohemia, slain by the Black Prince at Cressy in 1346, and that the Black Prince who slew the Bohemian assumed it out of modesty, to indicate that “he served under the king his father.”

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ABCDEFGHIJKLMNOPQRSTUVWXYZ

Entry taken from Dictionary of Phrase and Fable, edited by the Rev. E. Cobham Brewer, LL.D. and revised in 1895.

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Ibiis or Eblis
Ibraham
Icarian
Icaros
Ice
Ice-blink (The)
Ice-brook
Ice Saints or Frost Saints
Iceberg
Iceland Dogs
Ich Dien
Ichneumon
Ichor (I-kor)
Ichthus
Icon Basilike
Iconoclasts (Greek, “image breakers”)
Idæan Mother
Idealism
Idealists
Ides
Idiom

See Also:

Ich dien