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Larēs

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The Etruscan lar (lord or hero). Among the Romans larēs were either domestic or public. Domestic lares were the souls of virtuous ancestors exalted to the rank of protectors. Public lares were the protectors of roads and streets. Domestic lares were images, like dogs, set behind the “hall” door, or in the laraʹrium or shrine. Wicked souls became lemʹurēs or ghosts that made night hideous. Penaʹtēs were the natural powers personified, and their office was to bring wealth and plenty, rather than to protect and avert danger. (See Fairy.)

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Entry taken from Dictionary of Phrase and Fable, edited by the Rev. E. Cobham Brewer, LL.D. and revised in 1895.

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Lapping Water
Laprel
Lapsus Linguæ (Latin)
Laputa
Lapwing (The)
Lar Familiaris (plu. Lares familiares)
Lara
Larboard
Larceny
Larder
Larēs
Large
Larigot
Lark
Larks
Larry Dugan’s Eye-water
Lars
Larvæ
Lascar
Last. (Anglo-Saxon lást, a footstep, a shoemaker’s last.)
Last Man (The)

Linking here:

Fairies
Lar Familiaris (plu. Lares familiares)

See Also:

Lares