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Lose the Horse or win the Saddle

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Everything or nothing. “Aut Cæsar, aut nullus.” A man made the bet of a horse that another could not say the Lord’s Prayer without a wandering thought. The bet was accepted, but before half-way through the person who accepted the bet looked up and said, “By-the-bye, do you mean the saddle also?”

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ABCDEFGHIJKLMNOPQRSTUVWXYZ

Entry taken from Dictionary of Phrase and Fable, edited by the Rev. E. Cobham Brewer, LL.D. and revised in 1895.

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Lord of the Isles
Loredano (James)
Lorenzo (in Edward Young’s Nights Thoughts)
Loretto
Lorrequer (Harry)
Lose
Lose Caste (To)
Lose Heart (To)
Lose not a Tide
Lose the Day (To)
Lose the Horse or win the Saddle
Losing a Ship for a Haporth o Tar
Loss
Lost Island
Lothair
Lothario
Lothian (Scotland)
Lotus
Lotus-eaters or Lotophagi
Loud Patterns
Loud as Tom of Lincoln