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Maundrel

.

A foolish, vapouring gossip. The Scotch say, “Haud your tongue, maundrel.” As a verb it means to babble, to prate. In some parts of Scotland the talk of persons in delirium, in sleep, and in intoxication is called maundrel. The term is from Sir John Mandeville, the traveller, who published an account of his travels, full of idle gossip and most improbable events.

⁂ There is another verb, maunder (to mutter, to vapour, or wander in one’s talk). This verb is from maund (to beg). (See Maundy Thursday.)

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Entry taken from Dictionary of Phrase and Fable, edited by the Rev. E. Cobham Brewer, LL.D. and revised in 1895.

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Maudlin
Maugis
Maugis dAygremont
Maugrabin (Heyraddin)
Maugys
Maul
Maul (The Giant)
Maul of Monks (The)
Maunciples Tale
Maunds (Royal)
Maundrel
Maundy Thursday
Mauri-gasima
Mauritania
Mausoleum
Maut gets abune the Meal (The)
Mauthe Dog
Mauvais Ton (French)
Mauvaise Honte (French)
Mauvaise Plaisanterie (A)
Mavournin