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Sleep (Anglo-Saxon slæpen)

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Crabbe’s etymology of doze under this word is exquisite:—

“Doze, a variation from the French dors and the Latin dormio (to sleep), which was anciently dermio, and comes from the Greek derma (a skin), because people lay on skins when they slept”!—Synonyms.

To sleep away. To pass away in sleep, to consume in sleeping; as, to sleep one’s life away.

To sleep off. To get rid of by sleep.

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Entry taken from Dictionary of Phrase and Fable, edited by the Rev. E. Cobham Brewer, LL.D. and revised in 1895.

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Slap-dash
Slap-up
Slate
Slate Club (A)
Slate One (To)
Slating (A)
Slave
Sleave
Sleck-stone
Sledge-hammer
Sleep (Anglo-Saxon slæpen)
Sleep like a Top
Sleeper (The)
Sleeping Beauty
Sleepless Hat (A)
Sleepy Hollow
Sleeve
Sleeve of Care
Sleeve of Hildebrand (The)
Sleeveless Errand
Sleight of Hand

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