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Nonce

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For the nonce. A corruption of for then anes (for then once), meaning for this once. “An apron” for a naperon is an example of n transferred the other way. We have some halfdozen similar examples in the language, as “tother day”—i.e. the other or thæt other = the other. Nuncle used in King Lear, which was originally mine-uncle. An arrant knave is a narrant knave. (See Nag.)

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Entry taken from Dictionary of Phrase and Fable, edited by the Rev. E. Cobham Brewer, LL.D. and revised in 1895.

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Non Angli sed Angeli, si forent Christiani
Non Bis in Idem (Latin)
Non-Com. (A)
Non Compos Mentis or Non Com
Non Con
Non Est
Non mi Recordo
Non Plus (“no more” can be said on the subject)
Non Pros
Non Sequitur (A)
Nonce
Nonconformists
Nones
Nonjurors
Nonne Prestes Tale
Nor
Norfolk
Norfolk-Howards
Norfolk Street (Strand)
Norma
Normandy