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Slave (1 syl.)

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This is an example of the strange changes which come over some words. The Slavi were a tribe which once dwelt on the banks of the Dnieper, and were so called from slav (noble, illustrious); but as, in the lower ages of the Roman empire, vast multitudes of them were spread over Europe in the condition of captive servants, the word came to signify a slave.

Similarly, Goths means the good or godlike men; but since the invasion of the Goths the word has become synonymous with barbarous, bad, ungodlike.

Distraction is simply “dis-traho,” as diversion is “di-verto.” The French still employ the word for recreation or amusement, but when we talk of being distracted we mean anything but being amused or entertained.

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Entry taken from Dictionary of Phrase and Fable, edited by the Rev. E. Cobham Brewer, LL.D. and revised in 1895.

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Slander, Offence
Slang
Slang
Slap-bang
Slap-dash
Slap-up
Slate
Slate Club (A)
Slate One (To)
Slating (A)
Slave
Sleave
Sleck-stone
Sledge-hammer
Sleep (Anglo-Saxon slæpen)
Sleep like a Top
Sleeper (The)
Sleeping Beauty
Sleepless Hat (A)
Sleepy Hollow
Sleeve

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Distraction