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Sleeper (The)

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Epimenʹidēs, the Greek poet, is said to have fallen asleep in a cave when a boy, and not to have waked for fifty-seven years, when he found himself possessed of all wisdom. Rip Van Winkle, in Washington Irving’s tale, is supposed to sleep for twenty years, and wake up an old man, unknowing and unknown. (See Klaus.)

Sleepers. Timbers laid asleep or resting on something, as the sleepers of a railway. (Anglo-Saxon, slæpere.)

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Entry taken from Dictionary of Phrase and Fable, edited by the Rev. E. Cobham Brewer, LL.D. and revised in 1895.

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Slate Club (A)
Slate One (To)
Slating (A)
Slave
Sleave
Sleck-stone
Sledge-hammer
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Sleep like a Top
Sleeper (The)
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Sleepless Hat (A)
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Sleeve of Care
Sleeve of Hildebrand (The)
Sleeveless Errand
Sleight of Hand
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