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Tapster

,

says E. Adams (English Language,) properly means a bar-maid; “-ster” is the Anglo-Saxon feminine suffix -estre, which remains in spin-ster (a female spinner).

⁂ This is only a half-truth. After the thirteenth century, the suffix -ster was used for an agent of either sex. We have barrister, gamester, punster, etc., and Wickliffe uses songster for a male singer (See Dr. Morris: Historic Outlines, p. 89.)

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ABCDEFGHIJKLMNOPQRSTUVWXYZ

Entry taken from Dictionary of Phrase and Fable, edited by the Rev. E. Cobham Brewer, LL.D. and revised in 1895.

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Tantalos (Latin, Tantalus)
Tanthony (St. Anthony)
Tantum Ergo
Taou
Tap the Admiral
Tap the Till (To)
Tap-up Sunday
Tapis
Tapisserie
Tappit-hen (A)
Tapster
Tapu
Tarabolus or Tantrabolus
Tarakee
Tarantism
Tarantula
Tarentella or Tarantella
Tariff
Tarpaulins or Tars
Tarpeian Rock
Tarred