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Tarpeʹian Rock

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So called from Tarpeia, a vestal virgin, the daughter of Spurius Tarpeius, gʹovernor of the citadel on the Capitʹoline Hill. Tarpeia agreed to open the gates to the Sabines if they would give her “what they wore on their arms” (meaning their bracelets). The Sabines, “keeping their promise to the ear,” crushed her to death with their shields, and she was buried in that part of the hill called the Tarpeian Rock. Subsequently, traitors were cast down this rock and so killed.

Bear him to the rock Tarpeian, and from thence

Into destruction cast him.”


Shakespeare: Coriolanus, iii. 1

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Entry taken from Dictionary of Phrase and Fable, edited by the Rev. E. Cobham Brewer, LL.D. and revised in 1895.

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Tappit-hen (A)
Tapster
Tapu
Tarabolus or Tantrabolus
Tarakee
Tarantism
Tarantula
Tarentella or Tarantella
Tariff
Tarpaulins or Tars
Tarpeian Rock
Tarred
Tarring and Feathering
Tarrinzean Field
Tartan Plaid
Tartar
Tartaros (Greek), Tartarus (Latin)
Tartuffe
Tassel-Gentle
Tasselled Gentleman
Tatianists

See Also:

Tarpeian Rock