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Treacle [tree-kʹl]

properly means an antidote against the bite of wild beasts (Greek, theʹriaka [pharmăka], from thēr a wild beast). The ancients gave the name to several sorts of antidotes, but ultimately it was applied chiefly to Venice treacle (theʹriaca androchi), a compound of some sixty-four drugs in honey.

Sir Thomas More speaks of “a most strong treacle (i.e. antidote) against these venomous heresies.” And in an old version of Jeremiah viii. 22, “balm” is translated treacle—“Is there no treacle at Gilead? Is there no phisitian there?”

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Entry taken from Dictionary of Phrase and Fable, edited by the Rev. E. Cobham Brewer, LL.D. and revised in 1895.

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Translator-General
Trap
Trapani
Trapper
Trappists
Trasgo
Travels in the Blue
Traveller’s Licence
Traviata
Tre, Pol, Pen
Treacle [tree-kl]
Treading on One’s Corns
Treasures
Treasury of Sciences
Tree
Tree of Buddha (The)
Tree of Knowledge (The)
Tree of Liberty
Tree of Life
Trees
Tregeagle