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Walʹnut [foreign nut]

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It comes from Persia, and is so called to distinguish it from those native to Europe, as hazel, filbert, chestnut. (Anglo-Saxon, walh, foreign; hnutu, nut.)

“Some difficulty there is in cracking the name thereof. Why wallnuts, having no affinity to a wall, should be so called. The truth is, gual or wall in the old Dutch signifieth ‘strangeʹ or ‘exoticʹ (whence Welsh. foreigners); these nuts being no natives of England or Europe, but probably first fetched from Persia, and called by the French nux persique.”—Fuller: Worthies of England.

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Entry taken from Dictionary of Phrase and Fable, edited by the Rev. E. Cobham Brewer, LL.D. and revised in 1895.

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Wall (The)
Wall
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Walloons
Wallop
Wallsend Coals
Walnut [foreign nut]
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Wand

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Wales
Wallflower