Ovid

Ovid (Publius Ovidius Naso), Roman poet of the Augustan age, born at Salmo, of equestrian rank, bred for the bar, and serving the State in the department of law for a time, threw it up for literature and a life of pleasure; was the author, among other works, of the “Amores,” “Fasti,” and the “Metamorphoses,” the friend of Horace and Virgil, and the favourite of Augustus, but for some unknown reason fell under the displeasure of the latter, and was banished in his fiftieth year, to end his days among the swamps of Scythia, near the Black Sea (B.C. 43-18 A.D.).

Definition taken from The Nuttall Encyclopædia, edited by the Reverend James Wood (1907)

Overstone, Baron * Oviedo
Oudh
Oudinot, Duke of Reggio
Ouida
Ouse
Outram, Sir James
Overbeck, Friedrich
Overbury, Sir Thomas
Overland Route
Overreach, Sir Giles
Overstone, Baron
Ovid
Oviedo
Owen, John
Owen, Sir Richard
Owen, Robert
Owens College
Oxenford, John
Oxenstiern, Axel, Count
Oxford
Oxford School
Oxford University

Nearby

Ovid in Brewer’s Dictionary of Phrase & Fable

Links here from Chalmers

Abelin, John Philip
Accius, Lucius
Acernus, Sebastian Fabian
Acuna, Fernando De
Albinovanus, C. Pedo
Amerbach, Vitus
Anguillara, John Andrew De
Antimachus
Antonides, John
Aratus
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