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Flying Dutchman

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A spectral ship, seen in stormy weather off the Cape of Good Hope, and considered ominous of ill-luck. Sir Walter Scott says she was originally a vessel laden with precious metal, but a horrible murder having been committed on board, the plague broke out among the crew, and no port would allow the vessel to enter. The ill-fated ship still wanders about like a ghost, doomed to be sea-tossed, but never more to enjoy rest. Captain Marryat has a novel called The Phantom Ship.

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Entry taken from Dictionary of Phrase and Fable, edited by the Rev. E. Cobham Brewer, LL.D. and revised in 1895.

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Fly (plural flies)
Fly-boy
Fly a Kite (To)
Fly-by-night (A)
Fly in One’s Face (To)
Fly in the Face of Danger (To)
Fly in the Face of Providence (To)
Fly Open (To)
Fly Out at (To)
Flying Colours (To come off with)
Flying Dutchman
Flying without Wings (No)
Flyman’s Plot (The)
Fog-eater
Fogie or Fogey
Fo-hi or Foë
Foil
Folio
Folk
Folk
Folk-lore

See Also:

Flying Dutchman