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Shire and County

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When the Saxon kings created an earl, they gave him a shire or division of land to govern. At the Norman conquest the word count superseded the title of earl, and the earldom was called a county. Even to the present hour we call the wife of an earl a countess. (Anglo-Saxon, scire, from sciran, to divide.)

He comes from the shires; has a seat in the shires, etc.—in those English counties which terminate in “shire:” a belt running from Devonshire and Hampshire in a north-east direction. In a general way it means the midland counties.

⁂ Anglesey in Wales, and twelve counties of England, do not terminate in “shire.”

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Entry taken from Dictionary of Phrase and Fable, edited by the Rev. E. Cobham Brewer, LL.D. and revised in 1895.

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Shinar
Shindy
Shingebis
Ship (the device of Paris)
Ship Letters
Ship-shape
Ship of the Desert
Ships
Ships of the Line
Shipton
Shire and County
Shire Horses
Shirt
Shittim Wood
Shivering Mountain
Shoddy
Shoe
Shoe-loosed
Shoe Pinches
Shoe a Goose (To)
Shoe the Anchor (To)