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Wall-eyed

properly means “withered-eyed.” Persons are wall-eyed when the white is unusually large, and the sight defective; hence Shakespeare has wall-eyed wrath, wall-eyed slave, etc. When King John says, “My rage was blind,” he virtually says his “wrath was wall-eyed.” (Saxon, hwelan, to wither. The word is often written whall-eyed, or whallied, from the verb whally.)

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Entry taken from Dictionary of Phrase and Fable, edited by the Rev. E. Cobham Brewer, LL.D. and revised in 1895.

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Walk not in the Public Ways
Walk the Plank (To)
Walk through One’s Part (To)
Walker
Walker’s Bus
Walking Gentleman (A)
Walking Sword (A)
Walkyries (The)
Wall (The)
Wall
Wall-eyed
Walls have Ears
Wallace’s Larder
Wallflower
Walloons
Wallop
Wallsend Coals
Walnut [foreign nut]
Walnut Tree
Walpurgis Night
Walston (St.)